Baroque Freshwater Pearl in Sterling Silver Tension Wrapped Pendant

  • $29.99
Tax included.


Total Weight: 9.73 carats
Size: 30 mm tall by 12 mm wide by 4 mm thick
Wire Metal: Sterling Silver
Material: Baroque Freshwater Pearl
On sale today is a beautiful Baroque Freshwater Pearl artfully wrapped in a tension forged sterling silver wire wrap. This is a gorgeous flat pearl that has a wonderful opalescent color that shimmers and flashes in the light. This delicate glowing pearl is made even more spectacular by the sparkling waves of sterling silver that securely grasp it and set off the colors to perfection.
Scientifically, freshwater pearls are a kind of pearl that come from freshwater mussels. They are produced in Japan and the United States on a limited scale, but are now almost exclusive to China. The US Federal Trade Commission requires that freshwater pearls be referred to as " freshwater cultured pearls" in commerce. Also, baroque pearls are simply the name for pearls that have an irregular shape. Cultured freshwater pearls are most commonly baroque, because freshwater pearls are mantle-tissue nucleated instead of bead nucleated. Thus, these pearls are rarely perfectly spherical and can appear oval or flat.  
Metaphysically, freshwater pearls bring centering and a calming reflection, as well as attune the wearer to the ebb and flow of life. They are helpful in promoting faith, charity, and integrity, especially personal integrity. Due to its water and lunar connection, it is quite balancing for the emotions, especially for water signs.
 
My wire work is all done by me in a tension forging technique using a hammer and anvil. I have been using this technique for almost 17 years with great results. I call it tension forging because all that holds the piece securely in the wrap is the tension of the wire. It is a single piece of wire and there is no glue or solder added making it exceedingly organic while still remaining very secure.      
Photos: I try to give a good idea of the piece that you are buying, so I always take two photos. The first photo is in natural light and the second photo is under LED lights. That way you have an example of what the piece looks like in multiple lighting situations. This is also why the two photos do not always match but it is always of the same piece of jewelry.